Network Forensics: A blog post by Erik Hjelmvik

I have learned a lot about how to track malware and attackers in network traffic while developing and improving the network forensics tool NetworkMiner throughout the past  10 years. The primary purpose of NetworkMiner has always been to help incident responders and forensic investigators to do their job more efficiently. Even though NetworkMiner is my favourite tool for analysing PCAP files I’m still a regular user of other tools such as  Wireshark, tshark, tcpdump, Argus, ngrep, tcpflow and of course CapLoader. However, incident response and forensic work is much more than just knowing what tools to use. It is more about knowing what data to analyze and why.

I will teach several of my favourite techniques for analysing intrusions, tracking criminals and doing threat hunting at the Network Forensics Training at 44CON. The participants will learn how to investigate intrusions and find forensic artefacts in a dataset of several gigabytes of captured network traffic. The training primarily focuses on practical analysis techniques for finding and tracing malicious actors, which involves a great deal of hands-on practice with finding evil in PCAP data.

The first day of training focuses on analysis using only open source tools. The second day primarily covers training on the commercial software from Netresec, i.e. NetworkMiner Professional and CapLoader. All students enrolling in the class will get a full 6 month license for both these commercial tools. This training is not only a unique opportunity to learn how to use NetworkMiner and CapLoader directly from the guy who develops them, it is also a great excuse to spend two full days playing around with PCAP files.

You can find more details about the training here.